Section 41 Income Tax Act Notional Income | Deemed Profit |

Section 41 of the Income tax Act enumerates items of notional income which are deemed to be income from business or profession chargeable to tax. Section 41 states that, The liability to tax in respect of deemed profits would arise not only during the existence of the business but also after its discontinuance. The items of deemed profits under section 41 are enlisted below.  There are many clauses in Section 41 which are explained in detial below.

(i) Remission of Liability or Recoupment of Loss or Expenditure: Section 41 Income Tax Act

Where any allowance or deduction has been made in the assessment for any year in respect of losses, expenditure or trading liability incurred by the assessee and subsequently the assessee or his/its successor in business has obtained, whether in cash or in any other manner whatsoever, any amount in respect of such loss or expenditure or some benefit in respect of such trading liability by way of remission or cessation thereof during any subsequent accounting year, the amount so obtained or the value of the benefit so accruing to the assessee or his/its successor in business as the case may be, must be deemed to be the profits and gains of business or profession and must be charged to tax as the income of the assessee or his/its successor in business as the case may be for the year in which the remission or cessation takes place.

This tax liability would arise irrespective of the fact whether the business or profession in respect of which the allowance or deduction has been made is being continued to be carried on by the assessee in the year of remission of liability or not. For instance, if sales tax is paid by the assessee in the year 1998-99 and the assessee gets a refund of sales-tax previously paid in the year 1999-2000, the refund would be taxable as the assessee’s income of 1999-2000.

But the taxability of any deemed profit on account of remission of liability or recoupment of loss would arise only if the liability in question or the amount of the loss was previously allowed as a deduction in computing the business income of the assessee.

For instance, if the income-tax assessment for the year in which the expenditure or loss was claimed was made exparte or was a best judgement assessment and the income was estimated, it cannot be said that the expenditure was actually allowed as a deduction in the assessment. Consequently, if there is a remission of the liability subsequently, the assessee cannot be brought to charge in respect of the same. The Finance (No. 2) Act, 1996 has clarified that unilateral write back of any liability would be taxable as deemed income.

“Successor in business” means –

(i) in case of amalgamation of companies the amalgamated company;

(ii) where the first mentioned person is succeeded by any other person in that business or profession, the other person;

(iii) where a firm carrying on business or profession is succeeded by another firm, the other firm;

(iv) where there has been a demerger, the resulting company.

(ii) Where any building, machinery plant or furniture owned by the assessee : Section 41 Income Tax Act

Where any building, machinery plant or furniture owned by the assessee and used for the purpose of business for which depreciation under Section 32(1)(i) is claimed, is sold, discarded, demolished or destroyed and the money payable together with scrap value in respect of such assets exceeds the written down value, the excess to the extent of difference between the actual cost and the written down value shall be taxable as business income in the previous year in which the moneys payable become due.

Even if in the year the moneys payable becomes due, the business for which these assets were used is no longer in existence, the provisions of this section shall apply as if the business is in existence in that previous year.

(iii) Capital expenditure on Scientific Research: Section 41 Income Tax Act

Where an assessee incurs capital expenditure on scientific research, the entire amount of such expenditure is allowable as a deduction in computing the business income of the assessee in the same year in which the expenditure is incurred. If subsequent to the incurring of the expenditure, the asset representing the capital expenditure is sold, without having been used for other purposes, the assessee would be liable to pay tax on the excess of sale proceeds together with the deduction allowed earlier over the amount of capital expenditure or the amount of deduction allowed earlier whichever is less.

Further, the assessee is liable to pay tax on the balancing charge even if the assessee’s business is not in existence during the previous year in which the money payable in respect of any asset becomes due.

Explanation : For the purpose of Section 41 Sub-section (3) –

(1) “moneys payable in respect of any building, machinery, plant or furniture” includes –

  • any insurance, salvage or compensation moneys payable in respect thereof;
  • where the building, machinery, plant or furniture is sold, the price for which it is sold,

so however, that where the actual cost of a motor car is, in accordance with the proviso to clause (1) of Section 43, taken to be twenty-five thousand rupees, the moneys payable in respect of such motor car shall be taken to be a sum which bears to the amount for which the motor car is sold or, as the case may be, the amount of any insurance, salvage or compensation moneys payable in respect thereof (including the amount of scrap value, if any) the same proportion as the amount of twenty-five thousand rupees bears to the actual cost of the motor car to the assessee as it would have been computed before applying the said provision;

(2) “sold” includes a transfer by way of exchange or a compulsory acquisition under any law for the time being in force but does not include a transfer, in a scheme of amalgamation, of any asset by the amalgamating company to the amalgamated company where the amalgamated company is an Indian Company.

(iv) Recovery of Bad Debts: Section 41 Income Tax Act

Where the assessee claims a deduction in any year in respect of a debt which has become bad or irrecoverable and the Assessing Officer allows a deduction to the extent of the bad debts, if subsequently the assessee recovers either the full amount of the debt which was previously written off as bad or part thereof, the amount so recovered would be chargeable to tax as the business income of the assessee in the year of recovery.

But if the amount claimed by the assessee as bad debt was previously disallowed by the Assessing Officer on the ground that it had not actually become bad or it was not written off by the assessee, when the money is recovered, there would be no liability to tax in respect thereof.

In cases where the Assessing Officer had allowed only a part thereof as bad, in the subsequent year of recovery, the tax liability under this section must be on the amount of difference between the amount recovered and the bad debt disallowed by the Assessing Officer.

(v) Withdrawal of any amount from special reserve: Section 41 Income Tax Act

Where a deduction has been allowed in respect of any special reserve created and maintained under clauses (viii) of Sub-section (1) of Section 36 any amount subsequently withdrawn from such special reserve shall be deemed to be the profits and gains of business or profession and accordingly be chargeable to income tax as the income of the previous year in which such amount is withdrawn.

Where any amount is withdrawn from the special reserve in a previous year in which the business is no longer in existence, the provisions of this sub-section shall apply as if the business is in existence in that previous year.

(vi) Set off of Losses of a Defunct Business against Deemed Profit: Section 41 Income Tax Act

Where the business or profession referred to in this section is no longer in existence and there is income chargeable to tax under points (i), (ii), (iv) and (v) given above in respect of that business or profession, any loss, not being a loss sustained in speculation business, which arose in that business or profession during the previous year in which it ceased to exist and which could not be set off against any other income of that previous year shall as far as may be, be set off against the income chargeable to tax under the sub-section aforesaid.

Updated: October 8, 2017 — 5:54 pm

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